The Carpeteria Blog

Your flooring resource for information and education

Two-level Countertop

Feb-26-2011 By carpeteria_admin

Are you considering a kitchen redesign? While you’re planning, be sure to take a look at the choices you have for countertop designs.

Of course you will want to choose a material that works well for your style and taste. But an important part of the process is the actual layout of your counter. For example, the two-level option here provides several advantages.

To start, the raised border hides the worst of a messy kitchen. This is particularly handy when entertaining. This border will camouflage dirty dishes while still maintaining the open feeling of the room. Even everyday counter items such as the soap container here are below the normal view from the living area, maintaining a sleeker look for the room.

This higher counter is rather narrow, possibly reflecting a lack of extra space. However, many raised counters can be wide enough to accommodate seating on the side opposite the kitchen. This multi-use option can support quick breakfasts before school as well as appetizers for dinner guests while you’re finishing the meal. It also can serve as an additional conversation area at parties.

Today’s wealth of solid-surface counter choices gives you more options. Their beauty works well as a design addition to any space. As you make your selections, find a countertop that complements your cabinets as well as the style and colors of the rest of your living space. With the right choice, your countertop can provide an effective transition from one functional space to another.

Small Space Living

Feb-13-2011 By carpeteria_admin

This one room holds a kitchen with island bar, dinette, living area and dining room, yet it feels spacious rather than crowded. What choices create this combination of space and function?

The smartest decision is the flooring. By choosing one versatile porcelain tile in a light tone and setting it on the diagonal, the eye naturally follows the tile lines, making the room appear much larger than it actually is. Picture a flooring transition between the kitchen and living areas or a straight horizontal tile layout and you can see what the flooring choice does for this room.

The second smart choice is furniture selection. By limiting the number of pieces, choosing smaller options such as a loveseat rather than full-size sofa, and selecting a circular dining table, the furniture doesn’t get in the way of the room’s traffic pattern. Rooms feel crowded if you have to constantly avoid hitting furniture as you walk through them. Traffic in this room is smooth and easy. Sticking to one style and wood tone also emphasizes the connections throughout the room, creating a design consistency that makes the space work.

The final positive factor is light. With the light flooring and walls combined with a vaulted ceiling and large windows, the edges of this room seem to disappear. Instead of focusing on its size, visitors will notice the activity areas instead. Altogether this is a very smart way to take full advantage of a space.