The Carpeteria Blog

Your flooring resource for information and education

Bedroom Blues

Jan-20-2012 By creatingyourspace

We’re not talking the emotional blues when we say bedroom blues. Blue in the bedroom is a beautiful color that creates a soothing and relaxing space. Blue is typically used for boys’ rooms, but this doesn’t mean it has to be a masculine only color. The range of blue colors means that there is probably a blue out there that will work with your floor color and bedroom furniture color.

This Mediterranean style bedroom uses blue accents to bring a pop of color to an otherwise neutral space. Neutral walls and a stone or concrete floor create a cool feeling in the room. Adding in rich blue accents in the throw on the bed and the mirror on the wall add a bit of energy to the room.  The energy isn’t the same as if the accents were red or orange. The cool tones of the blue color are typically thought to be more soothing than jarring.

Blue color on the walls or bedding would create bigger pops of color in this space. Larger expanses of color, no matter what color, will have a bigger impact on the feeling and energy of a room. Keeping the blue accents in this room to two relatively small elements keeps the room feeling neutral.  Layering different shades of blues can also work to create a more sophisticated color palette. Pale blue on the walls combined with richer accessories intensifies the calming feeling of the color. Lots of white in the room will keep the space from feeling too blue.

Floor Adds Shine to Basement Room

Mar-19-2011 By creatingyourspace

When you look at this room, its basement origins are hidden behind the daring and sophistication of its design.

Let’s start with the most powerful element in the room – the staircase. The homeowners made the wise choice to allocate the bulk of their redecorating budget to open up the basement stairwell and replace it with this almost sculpted staircase. The dark metal structure and brown wood stairs work together, making the space feel like a destination rather than a basement afterthought.

Notice the power of the floor in this room. This second design decision also defines the space as out of the ordinary. By choosing a surface with an almost commercial feel but adding the rich glossy finish, the floor echoes the staircase in its depths and provides an intriguing contrast to the matte finish of the sofa and loveseat. This flooring is not as expensive as other choices, but works so perfectly that it doesn’t feel like a budget-based decision.

The furniture and art also maintain the sophisticated modern look so effectively presented in this room. The sleek lines of the sofa and loveseat coordinate well with the daring zebra print on the area rug and the simple black and white vases on the coffee table.

The art wall creates the mood of a gallery, but the cost was minimized with the use of simple contemporary prints matted with off-the-shelf matching frames. It’s the number and the layout that creates an upscale image.

These homeowners wanted to turn their basement into a destination for family and visitors alike, and their smart design decisions helped them succeed.

The First Flooring

Jan-16-2011 By creatingyourspace

Sometimes a book can make you take a second look at an everyday idea or product. This is certainly the case with At Home, a new book by Bill Bryson. It focuses on things we take for granted in our homes and discusses how they developed over time.

This month all the newest in flooring will be shown at Surfaces, the largest flooring event in the U.S., so now is a good time to consider the start of flooring and the progress we’ve made.

Initially, homes were constructed to protect people from the elements. Not only were style and design unimportant, so was something as basic as comfort. Floors were simply the dirt a home was built upon, generally packed down.

Over time, wealthier people in England and other parts of Europe added layers of rushes over the dirt to keep down the dust and make the ground softer and warmer to walk on. These rushes were replenished about twice a year generally. However, don’t picture nice clean green grass or dry hay underfoot. People generally didn’t remove the old rushes; simply placing new rushes on top. This meant that floors were deep, natural havens for insects as well as worse options such as mice and rats.

Eventually wood, stone and tile replaced this practice, but choices were limited to what was available locally. Carpets, which often came from far away or were woven at home, were so valuable that they were hung on the walls or placed on tables. Certainly no one expected to walk on one.

It’s worthwhile to think of the challenges homeowners had in the past the next time you come into our showroom. You have an amazing selection of a variety of flooring materials gathered from across the world. Instead of picking up rushes, you can pick from our samples, and we will remove the old flooring before installing your new choice. And our rugs are meant for your feet, and are priced accordingly.

The First Flooring

Jan-16-2011 By carpeteria_admin

Sometimes a book can make you take a second look at an everyday idea or product. This is certainly the case with At Home, a new book by Bill Bryson. It focuses on things we take for granted in our homes and discusses how they developed over time.

This month all the newest in flooring will be shown at Surfaces, the largest flooring event in the U.S., so now is a good time to consider the start of flooring and the progress we’ve made.

Initially, homes were constructed to protect people from the elements. Not only were style and design unimportant, so was something as basic as comfort. Floors were simply the dirt a home was built upon, generally packed down.

Over time, wealthier people in England and other parts of Europe added layers of rushes over the dirt to keep down the dust and make the ground softer and warmer to walk on. These rushes were replenished about twice a year generally. However, don’t picture nice clean green grass or dry hay underfoot. People generally didn’t remove the old rushes; simply placing new rushes on top. This meant that floors were deep, natural havens for insects as well as worse options such as mice and rats.

Eventually wood, stone and tile replaced this practice, but choices were limited to what was available locally. Carpets, which often came from far away or were woven at home, were so valuable that they were hung on the walls or placed on tables. Certainly no one expected to walk on one.

It’s worthwhile to think of the challenges homeowners had in the past the next time you come into our showroom. You have an amazing selection of a variety of flooring materials gathered from across the world. Instead of picking up rushes, you can pick from our samples, and we will remove the old flooring before installing your new choice. And our rugs are meant for your feet, and are priced accordingly.