The Carpeteria Blog

Your flooring resource for information and education

Two-level Countertop

Feb-26-2011 By carpeteria_admin

Are you considering a kitchen redesign? While you’re planning, be sure to take a look at the choices you have for countertop designs.

Of course you will want to choose a material that works well for your style and taste. But an important part of the process is the actual layout of your counter. For example, the two-level option here provides several advantages.

To start, the raised border hides the worst of a messy kitchen. This is particularly handy when entertaining. This border will camouflage dirty dishes while still maintaining the open feeling of the room. Even everyday counter items such as the soap container here are below the normal view from the living area, maintaining a sleeker look for the room.

This higher counter is rather narrow, possibly reflecting a lack of extra space. However, many raised counters can be wide enough to accommodate seating on the side opposite the kitchen. This multi-use option can support quick breakfasts before school as well as appetizers for dinner guests while you’re finishing the meal. It also can serve as an additional conversation area at parties.

Today’s wealth of solid-surface counter choices gives you more options. Their beauty works well as a design addition to any space. As you make your selections, find a countertop that complements your cabinets as well as the style and colors of the rest of your living space. With the right choice, your countertop can provide an effective transition from one functional space to another.

Small Space Living

Feb-13-2011 By carpeteria_admin

This one room holds a kitchen with island bar, dinette, living area and dining room, yet it feels spacious rather than crowded. What choices create this combination of space and function?

The smartest decision is the flooring. By choosing one versatile porcelain tile in a light tone and setting it on the diagonal, the eye naturally follows the tile lines, making the room appear much larger than it actually is. Picture a flooring transition between the kitchen and living areas or a straight horizontal tile layout and you can see what the flooring choice does for this room.

The second smart choice is furniture selection. By limiting the number of pieces, choosing smaller options such as a loveseat rather than full-size sofa, and selecting a circular dining table, the furniture doesn’t get in the way of the room’s traffic pattern. Rooms feel crowded if you have to constantly avoid hitting furniture as you walk through them. Traffic in this room is smooth and easy. Sticking to one style and wood tone also emphasizes the connections throughout the room, creating a design consistency that makes the space work.

The final positive factor is light. With the light flooring and walls combined with a vaulted ceiling and large windows, the edges of this room seem to disappear. Instead of focusing on its size, visitors will notice the activity areas instead. Altogether this is a very smart way to take full advantage of a space.

When it comes to sleep many of us with busy and hectic lives don’t get enough. When we finally do lay our heads down it’s the start of a long and labored night trying to fall and stay asleep. So what do you do to make your bedroom a place which not only encourages sleep, but actually envelops you in such comfort and ahhhh inspiring plushness you’ll never want to leave? There are a few ways to create a relaxation haven without spending thousands on a new mattress.

Bed
Dressing the bed in comfort has never been easier with all of the great products and materials on the market right now. Start with the foundation by making the most of the mattress you have. Adding a feather bed or thick padding on top of the mattress will increase your comfort level ten-fold. Atop it, add high thread count sheets (600 or higher) for unbelievable softness. Throw a soft fleece blanket over the sheets and under an overstuffed feather comforter dressed in a velvet or silk duvet. Next are the pillows and lots of them. You’ll need large square European style ones to rest on the headboard, rectangle American style ones filled with feather or cushy foam, then your preferred sleeping pillows.  Think cocoon.

Floor
If you’re fortunate enough to have ultra thick wall–to-wall carpeting in your bedroom then you’ve got it made. If not, there are ways to remedy the situation. You’ll want softness on the floor for when you get in and out of bed. Cold feet are no fun and stepping on freezing tile or hardwood is miserable, so rugs are in order. Not just any rugs, but thick, soft and luxurious feeling ones like an Alpaca fur or Euro shag. Place them on each side of the bed and at the foot depending on your space.

Windows
Covering windows properly is extremely important to the quality of sleep you get. Make sure your window coverings close tightly or if they are drapes they should have a blackout lining to keep the brightness of the streetlights or the sun at bay.

A dark room, cushy bed and soft flooring will give your body and mind the peace it needs to fall asleep and stay there soundly for the recommended 7 to 8 hours.

Sharing your Heritage

Jan-30-2011 By creatingyourspace

Have you seen any of the shows on television that encourage families to part with family heirlooms or collections only to spend the money on some desired purchase such as a hot tub? It seems strange to discard your heritage in exchange for a temporary luxury item.

On the other hand, having your heirlooms packed away in boxes isn’t much better. Would you like to bring your family’s past into your present? You can do it by building a vignette that tells a story about one or more of your ancestors.

This family decided to celebrate a great grandfather who studied butterflies. Some of his reference books and personal notebooks provide the background to the left on this table, topped with the magnifying glass he used in the field. One of his loveliest specimen boxes leans against a panel and his microscope is in the focal position on the table. Add a few photographs and some of his sketches and you have more than a display of older items; you have a story of part of your family’s past.

Maybe for you, a favorite story may involve some recipes and old kitchen tools from Great Aunt Violet, known as the baker in the family, complete with photos of her around the picnic table behind her house. Or a collection of old tools may be displayed in Uncle Michael’s toolbox, joined with a shot of him working, sitting on one of the bookshelves he made that you inherited.

Why not make your family’s past an integral part of your present, by taking a little time to create a vignette that represents a favorite relative or two from your past and sharing the heritage they gave you with yourself and others.

Room Fix: Piano Problems

Jan-23-2011 By creatingyourspace

Imagine sitting at that beautiful piano to play on a nice afternoon. If you are a pianist, you will discover a problem immediately. This piano faces toward the window, leaving the sheet music in shadow rather than having the outside light fall on it.

Would you rather play at night? None of the lamps are close enough to give enough light to read music. Reading music requires as much light or more than what’s needed to read a book. While lovely, it’s clear that no one in this home plays.

Part two of what’s wrong with this picture comes from the window treatments. At the left, the window covering is a simple drape of fabric with some trim. The bow window, however, seems to have inspired someone to overdo. The same fabric and trim is overwhelmed by the rosettes at the window frames and the doubtful display of fabric in the middle of the window. You get the feeling that someone picked up one of those 101 window treatments books and lost their head.

If you clean up the windows, possibly eliminate that ruffled throw pillow on the sofa to the left and replace the flowered rug with one big enough to encompass the conversation area, you have a lovely room – as long as you don’t expect anyone to play that piano.

The First Flooring

Jan-16-2011 By carpeteria_admin

Sometimes a book can make you take a second look at an everyday idea or product. This is certainly the case with At Home, a new book by Bill Bryson. It focuses on things we take for granted in our homes and discusses how they developed over time.

This month all the newest in flooring will be shown at Surfaces, the largest flooring event in the U.S., so now is a good time to consider the start of flooring and the progress we’ve made.

Initially, homes were constructed to protect people from the elements. Not only were style and design unimportant, so was something as basic as comfort. Floors were simply the dirt a home was built upon, generally packed down.

Over time, wealthier people in England and other parts of Europe added layers of rushes over the dirt to keep down the dust and make the ground softer and warmer to walk on. These rushes were replenished about twice a year generally. However, don’t picture nice clean green grass or dry hay underfoot. People generally didn’t remove the old rushes; simply placing new rushes on top. This meant that floors were deep, natural havens for insects as well as worse options such as mice and rats.

Eventually wood, stone and tile replaced this practice, but choices were limited to what was available locally. Carpets, which often came from far away or were woven at home, were so valuable that they were hung on the walls or placed on tables. Certainly no one expected to walk on one.

It’s worthwhile to think of the challenges homeowners had in the past the next time you come into our showroom. You have an amazing selection of a variety of flooring materials gathered from across the world. Instead of picking up rushes, you can pick from our samples, and we will remove the old flooring before installing your new choice. And our rugs are meant for your feet, and are priced accordingly.

The First Flooring

Jan-16-2011 By creatingyourspace

Sometimes a book can make you take a second look at an everyday idea or product. This is certainly the case with At Home, a new book by Bill Bryson. It focuses on things we take for granted in our homes and discusses how they developed over time.

This month all the newest in flooring will be shown at Surfaces, the largest flooring event in the U.S., so now is a good time to consider the start of flooring and the progress we’ve made.

Initially, homes were constructed to protect people from the elements. Not only were style and design unimportant, so was something as basic as comfort. Floors were simply the dirt a home was built upon, generally packed down.

Over time, wealthier people in England and other parts of Europe added layers of rushes over the dirt to keep down the dust and make the ground softer and warmer to walk on. These rushes were replenished about twice a year generally. However, don’t picture nice clean green grass or dry hay underfoot. People generally didn’t remove the old rushes; simply placing new rushes on top. This meant that floors were deep, natural havens for insects as well as worse options such as mice and rats.

Eventually wood, stone and tile replaced this practice, but choices were limited to what was available locally. Carpets, which often came from far away or were woven at home, were so valuable that they were hung on the walls or placed on tables. Certainly no one expected to walk on one.

It’s worthwhile to think of the challenges homeowners had in the past the next time you come into our showroom. You have an amazing selection of a variety of flooring materials gathered from across the world. Instead of picking up rushes, you can pick from our samples, and we will remove the old flooring before installing your new choice. And our rugs are meant for your feet, and are priced accordingly.

Create a Calendar for Your Home

Dec-31-2010 By carpeteria_admin

As we approach 2011, what do you do to prepare for the New Year? For some people, buying a new calendar and copying over all the birthdays, holidays and family anniversaries from the old calendar becomes almost an annual ritual.

Whether you use a classic printed calendar or have moved to a computerized one, you may want to add something else to your planning for next year – home maintenance.

No matter what type of flooring you have, it’s a good idea to follow the manufacturer’s guidelines for cleaning and sealing your home products. Granite countertops also need regular sealing to stay beautiful and reliable.

In the bustle of everyday life, it’s easy to let these events slip far beyond their due date. By adding them to your calendar now, you have the opportunity to keep up with your home’s maintenance needs. Make it extra easy on yourself by adding in any contact information so that it’s easy to make the call when the requirements show up on your calendar.

So don’t force yourself to remember all the things you do to keep your house at its best – write them down, scheduling those maintenance requirements to work well with the seasons and your other plans for 2011.

Carpeteria Recycling Program

Dec-23-2010 By carpeteria_admin

It has been a fact that the old carpet and pad pulled up from consumers
homes have been piling up in American landfills since the inception of the
carpet industry. Recently it was announced that as much as 2.5 Million tons
of old carpet and pad per year are sent to the landfills throughout the US.

A few years ago Carpeteria implemented a recycling program. Initially,
several years ago, all the paper and cardboard generated from the office
and the warehouse was separated and sent out for recycling. At the same
time, Carpeteria was able to find manufacturers who could use old carpet
cushion after cleaning it. Thus, the second phase of the recycling program
was born; we purchased a large compactor and saved all the old carpet
cushion that came from jobs, along with new scraps. The compactor pressed
and baled the pad and had it ready for the manufacturer.

In the last year or so, some carpet manufacturers were able to perfect the
recycling of the old carpets and were looking for partners in the industry.
Again, Carpeteria was there in this effort to divert old carpets and pads
from the landfills.

We have a dedicated container that collects all of the carpet and pad that
are returned from the jobs, these are stacked and sorted, and on a weekly
basis are sent back to the carpet recycling center which in turn will sort
the carpet, compact it and bale it and send it to carpet manufacturers for
recycling.

The pads are separated and shipped to padding manufacturers who will clean
them and make them into recycled pad. In the next few months, Carpeteria
will offer several grades of recycled carpet pad.

We are pleased to announce that to date we have diverted almost 100 tons of
carpet and pad from the landfills of the Bay Area. A small effort on our
part, but it takes small efforts by all of us to reduce our carbon footprint
and reduce our impact on the planet.

Carpeteria Recycling Program

Dec-23-2010 By creatingyourspace

It has been a fact that the old carpet and pad pulled up from consumers
homes have been piling up in American landfills since the inception of the
carpet industry. Recently it was announced that as much as 2.5 Million tons
of old carpet and pad per year are sent to the landfills throughout the US.

A few years ago Carpeteria implemented a recycling program. Initially,
several years ago, all the paper and cardboard generated from the office
and the warehouse was separated and sent out for recycling. At the same
time, Carpeteria was able to find manufacturers who could use old carpet
cushion after cleaning it. Thus, the second phase of the recycling program
was born; we purchased a large compactor and saved all the old carpet
cushion that came from jobs, along with new scraps. The compactor pressed
and baled the pad and had it ready for the manufacturer.

In the last year or so, some carpet manufacturers were able to perfect the
recycling of the old carpets and were looking for partners in the industry.
Again, Carpeteria was there in this effort to divert old carpets and pads
from the landfills.

We have a dedicated container that collects all of the carpet and pad that
are returned from the jobs, these are stacked and sorted, and on a weekly
basis are sent back to the carpet recycling center which in turn will sort
the carpet, compact it and bale it and send it to carpet manufacturers for
recycling.

The pads are separated and shipped to padding manufacturers who will clean
them and make them into recycled pad. In the next few months, Carpeteria
will offer several grades of recycled carpet pad.

We are pleased to announce that to date we have diverted almost 100 tons of
carpet and pad from the landfills of the Bay Area. A small effort on our
part, but it takes small efforts by all of us to reduce our carbon footprint
and reduce our impact on the planet.